America’s 10 most stolen vehicles

“The increase in vehicle thefts over the past two years should be a reminder that drivers must do their part to protect their vehicles,” said NICB President and CEO Joe Wehrle. (Photo: Shutterstock) For many across the country, a car represents a rite of passage. If you’re lucky, it will be by your side for years to come. But your car’s safety is no guarantee. Drivers face exposures ranging from reckless drivers to sheer bad luck. While some risks are easy enough to cancel out, for some the very model car they own is itself a risk. While it’s easy to assume the latest cars are at the greatest risk, it turns out older models are very popular amongst thieves. The latest report from the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB) identifies the 10 most stolen vehicles in the U.S. The report examines vehicle theft data submitted by law enforcement to the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) and determines the vehicle make, model and model year most reported stolen in 2016. While thefts are down since their all-time high in 1992, thousands of vehicles continue to be stolen each year because owners leave their keys or fobs in the vehicles. Related: Car wreck: Personal Auto net incurred losses could soon reach record high Frank Scafidi, director of public affairs for the NICB, advises drivers to park in a secure facility since most thefts occur from publicly accessible locations. For owners with cars which predate more modern anti-theft measures, “The Club” is an effective theft deterrent. “If owners just take the time to lock their vehicles and take their keys, they’ll reduce their theft risk considerably,” said Scafidi. With this in mind, keep reading to see America’s 10 most stolen vehicles:


About John Fagan

John is a Jacksonville native who grew up on the First Coast. He graduated from Bishop Kenny High School in 1975 and went to college at Florida State University where he completed a 4-year program in 3 years. John graduated from the Florida State University College of Business in 1978 and went straight into Florida State University College of Law. While in law school, John earned a position on the prestigious Law Review Board serving as its Business Editor. As a law student, John studied in the Oxford program. He also interned with the Florida Legislature working in the Florida House of Representatives Criminal Justice Committee. John was admitted to the Florida Bar in 1981. John began his legal career as a law school intern in the State Attorney's Office in Jacksonville in 1981. After his internship, legendary State Attorney Ed Austin hired John as a full-time Assistant State Attorney for the Fourth Judicial Circuit (Clay, Duval, and Nassau Counties). As a prosecutor, John tried jury and non-jury trial on charges ranging from DUI to Murder. In 1983, John moved from the State Attorney's Office to begin his career in private practice. He has practiced law for 30 years on the First Coast. For the last 20 years, John and his family have made Clay County their home. John limits his practice to personal injury and disability cases. While there are many fine attorneys in Clay County, John is one of only a few Clay County attorneys who limit their practice to personal injury and disability cases. John takes pride in helping clients resolve injury claims in ways that avoid the stress, uncertainty, and the expense of unnecessary litigation. Professional Activities John is the past President of the Clay County Bar Association and has served on the Board of the Clay County Bar Association from 2009-2013. He is an active member of the Florida Bar, and the Federal Bar of the Middle and Southern Districts of Florida. He is also a member of the American Association of Justice, the Florida Association of Justice, the National Organization of Social Security Claimants' Representatives, and the National Organization of Veterans' Advocates. Service to the Community John is involved in the Clay County Community serving as a member and Director of the Rotary Club of Orange Park, of the Clay County Bar Association, and the Putnam County Bar Association.
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